Hoodoo Nights

My Personal Copy of the Hoodoo course book

Time management is a fine art. I often times amaze myself on how I can pack a million things into my day-to-day routine. I am a professional and as such have long hours at work. My husband and I raise two kids, and if being a parent does not taking enough of my time, add to that being an Olosha (yes, I do have godchildren to attend as well) and a Yaya Nkisi. Religious obligations take time, the blog takes time and keeping up with my intense curiosity for all things spiritual takes time as well.

For over three years I had been promising myself that I would carve a bit of said precious time to satisfy an intellectual and spiritual desire to learn about Hoodoo and its practices. Having lived in the South of the United States for over two decades and married a man from Louisiana made it natural for me to feel inclined to learn the traditions of the Deep South. But I needed not to marry a descendant from French Cajun folks to fall in love with the mystique of the South. You see, I have always loved Louisiana.

I visited the Big Easy for the first time at the age of 13. It was then I fell in love with its yawning bayous, its hot humid summer nights by the Mississippi and the gentile ways of white, black and creole folks. I came back home to Puerto Rico after a summer vacation with my senses on fire because I had too discovered a world of magic behind the polished façade of fancy hotels and restaurants made to lure and comfort tourists like me. My keen eyes had noticed while walking the streets of New Orleans, curio shops filled with oils and herbs, mojo bags and dried up alligator body parts…it made me think of our botánicas back in Puerto Rico, minus the alligators, that is.

It would be years later for me to learn about Hoodoo and its origins and to fall utterly in love with all it has to offer to the spiritual intellectual and practitioner such as myself. Thanks to my industrious husband, I found a great website with loads of information on Hoodoo and after thinking about it for over two years, yes I am slow to consider becoming someone´s student, I decided to enroll in a correspondent course on Hoodoo. Ms. Cat is my correspondent teacher. I feel she is very resourceful, sharp-witted and extremely devoted to all things Hoodoo, she dedicates a great deal of her time to run her curio shop out of California and to share her knowledge with folks like me.

I started the course on January of 2011, but before I could get my hands on my Hoodoo Rootwork Correspondence Course book, I chewed up through piles of other texts that she has recommended for study on her website. It was very much worth following her recommendations as those lay the foundation to a world of magic, culture and tradition that is a great system on its own.

My nights started to be reshaped. Once homework is completed, dinner has been served and the kitchen tidied, children are in bed and the house has fallen quiet, the time comes to close the day with my habitual spiritual routines, and finally, to come to bed.

Hoodoo nights are my favorite, they are far and few, however, they are filled with intense reading, note taking and with making plans to put into practice over the weekend the lessons learned from the book.

You may still wonder, what exactly is Hoodoo? Find out more in the post to come…

Omimelli
Oní Yemayá Achagbá

About Omimelli

I am a Olosha or Santera and for years I have been at the service of the Orisha and the community. I am initiated to Yemayá and my father in osha is Aganjú. I am also an initiate of Palo Mayombe and hold the title of Yaya Nkisi. As part of my daily devotional I spend time at my bóveda and work with my spirits on regular basis.
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9 Responses to Hoodoo Nights

  1. Iyawo Shango says:

    One of my Iyawo duties is herb research and came across her site and use it for reference. I plan on taking the correspondence course once my year is up.. Right now I want focus on making sure I’m learning and understanding all that I need to learn an understand as an Iyawo. I look forward to your next post on this and how this course helps you! *thumbs up*

  2. Omimelli says:

    Hello Iyawo Shango,

    I am very happy to see that you have a task to accomplish during your iyawo year. The course is intense and rather demanding of time, but if you pour yourself into it, great benefit will follow.

    Just remember, keep it separated from Santeria and other ideas, this way you get from it its full impact and beauty. There is no drinking coffee from a cup half-filled with orange juice. 🙂

    Ashé iyawó

    Omimelli

  3. Mama Vescha says:

    Ms. Cat is truly gift from God. She’s a wonderful woman and a wonderful teacher. She’s very kind, very devoted, you will learn many traditional teachings from what she has collected to spread to others who have that desire to learn the Art of African American Folklore. Good luck to you in your adventure!

  4. Omimelli says:

    Hello Mama Vescha,

    I thank you for your visit to the blog. I am really happy that I followed my instinct to enroll in the course. The first time I ever got a package from her in the mail and I opened one of the oils made at her shop I was elated. The scent, energy and quality of her work came out of that bottle like the proverbial genie. That in itself made me want to enroll.

    It is rare to find a good teacher. I like them to be exact, direct and kind, she is all of that and more. I do look forward to continuing with my homeworks and perhaps once I graduate to go and visit during summer for a follow up in person.

    I do hope that many get inspired to learn the Hoodoo arts, the folkkore is rich like molasses, and just as tasty.

    Omimelli

  5. Oyalenu says:

    I’ve been buying from her store for some time. It’s nice to hear that the course is good. I’ve been thinking about taking it for the last couple of months. Thanks!

    • Omimelli says:

      Hello Oyalenu

      I think you will find it most interesting. Like I said, if you dedicate a good deal of time to reading and practicing as she suggests, you will learn quite a few good things.

      Good luck,

      Omimelli

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  7. Setanaya says:

    I love the luckt Mojo site, and I completely understand where you are coming from. The Deep South is a magical place. I feel that Hoodoo is something that either speaks to your soul, or it doesn’t. I want to apply for the Hoodoo course this summer and I love that you have talked about it here. I look forward to reading more posts.

    Good Luck on this path,
    Setanaya

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